Archive for February, 2016
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Art and/as Process – Biodiversity residencies (part1)

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There was nothing unusual about the flight from Toronto to Quito. For a few minutes in line at U.S. Customs I thought I might not make my flight as the line was huge and my flight was leaving in less then an hour. I landed in Quito 12 hrs later. Got into my Hostel at 2 am and crashed. Did not realize it then but the altitude in Quito, combined with jetlag and the flue I have yet to fully recover from left little energy in me. After breakfast I got out my travel itinerary that had details and broad strokes about different sections of my 80-day research trip. Found myself staring at the page section that only had the name of the place I was going to without any other details. The longer I stared the more anxious I began to feel, thinking that somehow the details would fill themselves in.

    Next came the questions: do I have enough money, is my Spanish good enough, what bus do I need to get to the terminal… In my tired state I was forgetting that that section of the trip was left undefined for a reason. I closed the itinerary, took a deep breath. This was something to be resolved later as other pieces of the trip would unfold. I had more pressing concerns now, like buying a new hat since I left mine on the plane, dammit.

    Getting to “Un poco del Chocó” biological reserve took about 4hrs from Quito. 30 min on local transit across the sprawling city, 2hrs on a regional bus and 45min in a 4×4 on the one road that gets to the reserve. A road that become important to me later on.

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Un poco del Chocó view from one of the trails

    The reserve is located in the Chocó region of Ecuador and is situated between 950 and 1200 meters above the sea level. It protects a small part of the ecosystem that once covered most of the region. It is a biological hotspot, with a great biodiversity that is in danger of disappearing; 83% of forests in Ecuador have been cut down since the 40s.

    My goal was to observe and learn from the researchers about how biodiversity is studied and understood. Parallel, I conducted my own observations, made watercolour studies and took photos of what interested me.

    Five days into the experience, I hit a wall. With so much stimulus I was having a hard time fitting the pieces with my initial idea for the work that would address the loss of biodiversity. Working with watercolours has proven to be a lot harder than originally expected. The humidity changed the watercolour pencils making them gummy, things took much longer to dry and regular rain and bugs made a lot of the locations I became interested in difficult or impossible to paint in. Then my camera stopped working do to moisture.

    In order not to focus on the negative I focused on what I still could do. Every weekday I worked for the first half of the day helping to maintain the reserve, learning about different plants and ways of working with bamboo or palms. Walking the 5 km of the reserve trails had multiple benefits. They gave access to different levels of the tree canopy, waterfalls, areas of secondary succession and the river.With every walk there was a new discovery and things seen before could be seen during different parts of the day in a new light. The second thing that provided me with a lot if interesting information’s and way of looking at things were the conversations with the student researchers. I was lucky to have arrived when two were just completing their research and another two were arriving to start. Each had their own uniqe perspectives and experiences to share.

    On the second weekend, Jonathan, one of the new arrivals was going to walk to Las Tolas. It is the nearest village, about 12km up the road and it’s about 700 meters higher then the reserve. Up to that point I did not give much consideration to the road as it was outside the reserve. Wanting to break the routine and see more of the area I went along with him and another researcher, Jaimie. They were both starting their research related to different bird species. The walk proved a crucial experience on my way to figuring out how to fit the pieces of what I was experiencing. It was my first sunny day there as it rained for the most part in the weeks prior. I found interesting locations to paint in without the aforementioned problems and the road gave me a much broader perspective on the surrounding area. Jonathan also volunteered to take photos on his phone for me during the walk adding to my already fruitful day.

    The next weekend I was left alone on the reserve. The volunteers and researchers would usually leave on the weekends to see other parts of Ecuador and this time Nicole and Wilo, the owners, left as well for a much deserved break. Nicole left me a phone in case of emergency. On Saturday I went out for what were now my regular walks on the road. I had a few different spots 4 km+ from the reserve where I liked to paint and meditate. They were located at different parts of a hill around 1500 meters above sea level. On my way there I came across a trail of leaf cutter ants which a lot of their soldiers running back and forth. As I was about to voice my usual lament of not having a camera I realized that I actually had one, Nicoles phone. I used the rest of the day to document all the spots I found on my daily trail and road walks that for one reason or other were interesting to me. 143 photos later my situation changed fully. I was content and a pattern was beginning to emerge…

Febuary 20, 2016
I am now Esperanza Verde , a wildlife rescue centre conducting further research into biodiversity and change. Due to difficult access to internet I will not be posting new blogs until late March or early April. Thanks!
Febuary 17, 2016
My stay in Canoa was rewarding. I finally got to try surfing, a great expression of fluidity and change. Found things here in the landscape that relate to what I became interested in at Un poco del Choco. Now I am on my way to Esperanza Verde, a wildlife rescue centre excited about the new experiances and ideas.
Febuary 10, 2016
I left the biological reserve for Canoa, a few days ago, before I travel to my next residency at Esperanza Verde. I was a little sad to leave but have learned a lot and have a lot of new material for future art works.