Nature: a Space of Flows
  • Poco del Choco_Road 1
  • Poco del Choco_Road 1
  • Poco del Choco_Bamboo 3
  • Poco del Choco_Bamboo 3
  • Poco del Choco_Bamboo 2
  • Poco del Choco_Bamboo 2
  • Poco del Choco_Bamboo 1
  • Poco del Choco_Bamboo 1
  • Etobicoke Creek ravine
  • Etobicoke Creek ravine
  • Canoa 3
  • Canoa 3
  • Canoa 2
  • Canoa 2
  • Canoa 1
  • Canoa 1
 

In 2016 I combined a self-directed residency with volunteering at Un poco del Chocó – a biological reserve in Ecuador. One day when I was painting the river valley zigzagging through the reserve, a pattern of growth emerged. It was something like a photograph in a time lapse stretching back centuries. I could discern where landslides occurred, where trees have fallen, and where people burned away the forest to make room for pasture. The seemingly static hill suddenly changed, its slow flow became perceptible in my imagination. The abstract notion of reality as process became evident in the environment around me. I started to look and think about nature as a space of flows.